Anatomy Fashion Show lends a hand to children’s hospitals

From the heart to the patella, the human body was on display at Phi Delta Epsilon’s annual Anatomy Fashion Show. Future healthcare professionals in the pre-medicine fraternity showcased their knowledge of the human body, while also getting in touch with their artistic side. 

Models walked a black catwalk and each displayed a bodily system painted onto their skin and clothing on Sunday Nov. 5. The house was packed, and every cent of the $5 ticket price went to a good cause: the nonprofit Children’s Miracle Network. 

The Children’s Miracle Network—a coalition of children’s hospitals—helps parents give their children quality care that they would otherwise be unable to afford. The University of Rochester Golisano Children’s Hospital is one of these Miracle hospitals. A grateful parent who received services at Golisano spoke at the fashion show on its behalf. 

Kevin Carrie—father of two—is an advocate for the Children’s Miracle Network. Carrie shared the story of his son John, who was diagnosed with a diffused brain tumor at the age of 12 after suffering a grand mal seizure. With the help of Golisano Children’s Hospital, John began treatment. 

Although doctors predicted Carrie’s son wouldn’t live another year, he graduated high school with honors and attended a post-high school program for adults with traumatic brain injuries. John, however, died in 2004. 

“Our family chooses not to mourn the death of our son, but to celebrate his life by helping other families through Children’s Miracle Network,” Carrie said. 

As the fashion show began, teams started to strut the runway. Each modeling team—made up of student organizations—was dedicated to an anatomical system.

Alpha Delta Epsilon sorority was the first team to take to the stage, modeling the lower musculature system. As they showed off the body paintings skillfully created on black clothing and bare skin, emcee junior Mackenzie Hintze read facts about the muscular system. 

Nine more teams proceeded, including members of two fraternities, Geneseo First Response, the women’s lacrosse team and the cheer team. The teams represented every part of the body—from the six-pack of a model showing off the upper muscular system to the fallopian tubes of the model demonstrating the reproductive system. 

“It’s our third time hosting this event,” Hintze said. “My committee and I really tried to advertise it a lot this year.” 

The show was also broken up by performances from Hips ’n Harmony, Emmelodics and Bhangra. 

Every year, 10,000 new children are admitted to a Children’s Miracle Network Hospital, according to Hintze. Phi Delta Epsilon not only provided an educational, worthwhile experience for scientists and non-scientists alike, but raised money for a well-deserving charity. 

“PhiDE is partnered with the Children’s Miracle Network on a national level,” Hintze said. “Each committee has a local children’s hospital they work with. We’re always looking for models.” 

The Anatomy Fashion Show gave students both a unique look at the human body and a way to help others’ bodies heal.

 Students modeling different body systems at pre-medical fraternity Phi Delta Epsilon’s annual Anatomy Fashion Show on Sunday Nov. 5. The event doubled as a fundraiser for the Children’s Miracle Network, a nonprofit partnered with the Golisano Children’s Hospital in Rochester. (Troy Hallahan/Advertising Manager)

Students modeling different body systems at pre-medical fraternity Phi Delta Epsilon’s annual Anatomy Fashion Show on Sunday Nov. 5. The event doubled as a fundraiser for the Children’s Miracle Network, a nonprofit partnered with the Golisano Children’s Hospital in Rochester. (Troy Hallahan/Advertising Manager)