A summer's worth of thought

I've never been a fan of summer in general, as far as journalistic quality goes. I mean, frankly, it's a waste of good material; all sorts of awesome things, or at least significant things, happen and I'm left unable to comment for an entire three months.

So this week, being a sort of genesis week for the semester, I decided to spout off random opinions I formed over the summer. The following, in no particular order, are things that I think:

Brett Favre was good the first time he retired. Everyone loved him. The second time, fine, he needed to leave and he was still a pretty good quarterback. The third time isn't the charm, and it's getting old.

Sticking with football for a moment, Michael Vick has paid his debt to society and I don't much care what PETA thinks about it. Come to think of it, I'm pretty much for any cause that PETA is against.

Politically, people who vote based on a single issue are fools. There's no cause for that sort of thing these days and anyone who does it shouldn't be allowed to vote. Learn what's actually going on, not what somebody's cousin's son's neighbor's kid told them at the diner. This is a big part of what's wrong with America today.

Universal healthcare won't work. Spending money is not an efficient means of problem-solving. The phrase "too big to fail" is stupid and needs to be critically examined.

In entertainment news, having just re-watched Braveheart, the battle cry, "They can take our lives but they cannot take our freedom!" needs some serious reconsideration.

Christoph Waltz deserves an Oscar. Anyone who has seen Inglourious Basterds will corroborate this.

Scientifically speaking, I spent a night staring up at the sky. The space shuttle Columbia was due for launch and, as I sat looking up, I realized why religions are formed by people who stare at stars. Supposedly, the launch would be visible, a sort of reverse shooting star, but it was delayed and I went inside, much mosquito-bitten and saddened. Still, the space program deserves our attention. We're an exploratory species.

Global warming is a fact, and anyone who lived in New York this summer has to agree by default. Those who don't should re-examine their position.

So those are my thoughts, disjointed and un-examined though they may be. I hope your summer was similarly full and, if you have any comments to share, you'll direct your attention to TheLamron.com and join in the discussion. Here's to a good year.

In